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Incorporating Emergency Preparedness and Hazard Mitigation into Adaptation Plans

June 10, 2013 - 11:30am - 1:00pmRegistration Closed
 Natural disasters related to climate variability and more intense development in risky areas seem increasingly common, more costly and are placing communities at progressively more risk. Events like floods, tsunamis, storm surges, hurricanes, & tornadoes can destroy homes and other infrastructure, shut down power sources, and damage water supplies. Emergency planning and hazard mitigation/climate adaptation steps taken in advance - pre-disaster planning - is critical to addressing these issues. Panelists in this webinar will offer examples of progressive emergency planning and solutions that promote community resiliency in the face of natural disasters. Attendees will also hear about the EPA's climate change adaptation efforts related to controlling potential hazardous contaminant release during disasters.
 
 Moderator: Brian Bulla, NC State University
 
 
 
Please complete a 5 minute evaluation if you attended or watched any of the recordings.
 
 Jennifer Brady, Program Analyst, US EPA Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Management, Washington, DC
 Preventing and reducing exposure to contaminants and hazardous sites from climate change impacts
 Presentation: MP4 File (19 minutes, 12.6 MB)
 
 Edward A. Thomas, President, Natural Hazard Mitigation Association (www.nhma.info), Quincy, MA
 Building community resilience through hazard mitigation & climate adaptation
 Presentation: Slides MP4 File (19 minutes, 14.8 MB)
 
 Milton Houseman, Police Sgt., Emergency Management and Homeland Security, City of Biloxi, Mississippi
 Case Study, Biloxi Mississippi's efforts to incorporate climate change adaptation into emergency planning
 Presentation: Slides MP4 File (16 minutes, 11.0 MB)
 
 Question & Answer Recording: MP4 File (28 minutes, 18.4 MB)
 
 Follow Up Questions:
 
 Milton: What kind of materials or assistance would be helpful to you from the federal or state government?
 MEMA and FEMA's continued oversight coupled with the approval of our work, planning, and the implementation of our programs is most helpful as it validates our actions.
 
 Ed: How can communities better incorporate the conservation of natural resources in their hazard mitigation plans?
 There is an extremely well done production about one community's success in using naturally beneficial wetlands to protect from flooding located at: http://www.riversnetwork.org/rbo/index.php/component/k2/item/3019-flood-management-in-the-otter-creek?goback=.gde_1602147_member_254045089 A huge well-done to Mike Kline and all involved in carrying out this work over many years prior to the Irene flood. This approach is a fine example of the work of the communities in the Resilient Neighbors Network. Further Information at: [http://nhma.info/projects/resilient-neighbors/ ] This video is well worth a close look & listen. Especially nice to hear the narration by Governor Howard Dean, who when in office in Vermont provided outstanding leadership in floodplain management, hazard mitigation, and disaster relief. This video really reminded me of another, longer explanation of the effect of fill on river systems, created in the 1970's by the Natural Resources Defense Council. Narrated by Hugh Downs, this film, Planning for Floods went through multiple examples from that era to explain similar concepts to this excellent presentation. I understated that the NRDC/Hugh Downs film is available as a VHS video product through: http://www.worldcat.org/title/planning-for-floods/oclc/31930396
 
 Q: Is there a good example/case study of a community that planned ahead well and then had a disaster showing the value of making those changes in advance?
 There is an extremely well done production about one community's success in using naturally beneficial wetlands to protect from flooding located at: http://www.riversnetwork.org/rbo/index.php/component/k2/item/3019-flood-management-in-the-otter-creek?goback=.gde_1602147_member_254045089 This video is well worth a close look & listen. It was especially nice for me to hear the narration by Governor Howard Dean, who when in office in Vermont provided outstanding leadership in floodplain management, hazard mitigation, and disaster relief. This video really reminded me of another, longer explanation of the effect of fill on river systems, created in the 1970's by the Natural Resources Defense Council. Narrated by Hugh Downs, this film, Planning for Floods went through multiple examples from that era to explain similar concepts to this excellent presentation. I understated that the NRDC/Hugh Downs film is available as a VHS video product through: http://www.worldcat.org/title/planning-for-floods/oclc/31930396 A huge well-done to Mike Kline and all involved in carrying out this work over many years prior to the Irene flood. This approach is a fine example of the work of the communities in the Resilient Neighbors Network. Several communities such as Tulsa Oklahoma and Charlotte/Mecklenburg, North Carolina have been working for many years at efforts to: A) Stop making disasters worse through good land use planning and stronger floodplain management and/or building codes; and B) Improve the errors of the past through programs of stream restoration and acquisition of repetitively damaged properties. Further Information at: http://nhma.info/projects/resilient-neighbors/ Another incredible example is the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District in Colorado, as mentioned in my presentation. ET
 
 How do city or county governments get downscaled climate information and mapping specific to their location?
 NOAA and/or the Center for Clean Air Policy might be able to help with this reply. ET
 
 : How would you recommend helping a community without a major disaster to see they are still vulnerable even though that disaster hasnít happened yet? The elected officials also need to buy-in
 Use of models, discussion and negotiation efforts.
 
 Sgt. Houseman: What has been the participation or buy-in of the local business community? How have you gotten them engaged in the planning process and implementation of any proactive actions?
 Participation buy our Major Employers (Casino Industry) has set an example for other businesses to follow. Some businesses have built back even higher than the current requirement. One of the few good outcomes of Katrina was business owners seeing what wind and water can do. I believe there is no better way to convince someone than for them to experience it firsthand. MH
 
 Iíd like to see the vulnerability list. Could we see a link to where those will be?
 See if the White House State-By-State reports about the impacts of extreme weather and carbon pollution help: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/06/26/state-state-reports-president-obamas-plan-cut-carbon-pollution-and-prepare-consequen?goback=.gde_1988319_member_253329365
 
 Do you expect any of the contractors or professionals to have any sort of certificate to show that they understand the climate change risks to take into account when they are rebuilding following destructive storms? Is training part of the disaster risk r
 Great question. We need to do a vastly better job of training planners, architects and engineers as well as builders, community officials and Attorneys both before and after disasters. ET
 
 Ed: Do you think that the progressive work that the Metro Denver Urban Drainage is doing with respect to pro-active adaptation planning is primarily a function of having strong planning and EM leaders in place, or is it more a function of the local commun
 My view is that this effort is a monument to the leadership skills and vision of a small group. ET
 
 Milton: Would you be willing to share the language you used regarding CC in your hazard mitigation plan, was well as the interactive game you used to educate the public?
 I would be glad to share any information that would be helpful.


    Contact:
    Phone: 919-515-3184
    Email: susan_moore@ncsu.edu, james_mccarter@ncsu.edu
    Website/Webinar:
info@climate-adaptation-symposium.org